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on the first lady's. the body of knowledge on lincoln pretty much everything that could be written probably has been. the greatest historian says been years poring through the letters and the evidence to produce this book on lincoln of this book and the hundreds of books on washington. so my problem is, why not look at the person that new them the best, the first lady because historians have largely ignored the role of the first lady as the largely ignored the mistresses and shipping the man. tend to be older man, educated in a certain way. most historians, as i always say, were not educated in matters of the heart. studying the first lady, the first thing thomas jefferson did after spending 17 days cooped up in of lost outside a philadelphia writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did is he went shopping for market, his wife. he mr. she was pregnant. she had had a miscarriage. he bought her some gloves. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so he could go home to be with his wife. every winter of the revolutionary war. suffering through the freezing wea
not always work out well for vice presidents. in 1865, lincoln's second term, that's significant speech will remember -- that magnificent speech, healing speech -- his vice president was ander johnsorew johnson. affusion ticket in 1864 -- a fusion ticket in 1864. johnson arrived with the flu. he gave, for what it was all accounts, a completely inebriated address. lincoln was mortified. it said the public image -- set the public image of andrew johnson. another disastrous vice- presidential inaugural address was calvin coolidge's. he used that opportunity to state and how the filibuster should be done away with. president roosevelt's second inauguration, that is when the congress started before the president. now presidents and vice presidents began to be sworn outside of the steps. there was one exception in the long tradition of inauguration's being held in the capital. that was in 1945, when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. he was the only president of united states to serve more than two terms. his third inauguration was of the capital. his fourth one was in t
? there are too many -- >> yeah. well, ed, why don't you talk about lincoln's second inaugural and the fact nobody thought that was a big deal. >> yeah, if you go back and read the press, the inaugural speech considered the greatest in american history now that we actually study and there's very few we do, lincoln's second inaugural, binding up the wounds of the nation and so forth. the response at the time was what was that? what's he actually going to do with the south now? >> yeah, what kind of program is that? >> how did we get to -- how did we get to a tradition of having poets? it seems like every inaugural we have a poet. >> it's not a tradition. >> john f. kennedy was the first one. >> robert frost in 1961. >> in our lifetimes, don. >> our lifetimes. >> not yours, but ours. >> yeah, you're right. that was pretty close. i started thinking about that ever since -- when maya angelou gave her poem. and i was like, when did we start --. >> it's a great tradition. i think the only thing better would be having a historian. >> or three historians. >> we do mythology at inauguration and created a m
in other places. it was a political compromise. >> between lincoln and fulton and the beach. >> you're saying, why did they decide that exact plot? they brought someone from new york to come up with a park plan. they eventually made it a rectangle. they had the panhandle part. the panhandle was the same with as golden gate park, but there was dealmaking going on between park commissioners and they decided they would buy the land and cut off part of the panhandle. >> the development of lincoln park is interesting. you can see the cemetery. >> on the map, it is a cemetery. >> what happened to that and all of the bodies? >> they decided around the turn of the century the land was too valuable to bury people. where uss is now there were four cemeteries. they moved all of the cemetery's out -- cemeteries out. the heir did not want to move one of the places. there are two people -- two places where people are buried in the city. the other ones were moved out. >> the big scandal of lincoln park, someone wanted to build the legion of honor out there. she did and she got it done. they had to
of the present day possible. without douglas, there is no oba obama. >> without lincoln, there is no obama, so it's not only a matter, is it, of faith in history, it's a matter of faith in people who have the imagination and the audacity to make history. >> absolutely. and certainly frederick douglas understood his role in terms of acting as an advocate during lincoln's administration. he was obviously putting some pressure on the white house. at the same time he was issuing a call to arms to his own community to rise up because he understood that history ultimately comes from below. you know, he is enveloping lincoln in a movement. there is a movement that surrounds lincoln and the other abolitionists to move all this forward and make it a reality. >> there were not 10,000 people there with you at the tomb, but the poem suggests someone else had been there and left this newspaper? >> there were other people who had come before me and had left various objects. i don't know who they were. someone had left a newspaper, perhaps aware, perhaps not, that douglas himself had been a journalist, that dou
luther king's, and president lincoln's. >> i barack hussein obama -- >> reporter: standing on the national mall, as many as 800,000 people. that is nearly twice as many people who attended the second inaugurals of presidents clinton and bush. before the oath and the party, today the president did a little work. >> this inauguration is a symbol of how our democracy works and how we peacefully transfer power. >> reporter: a national day of service, brought the first family to a d.c. elementary school for a bit of painting while around the nation's capital, the final touches were going on the parade route and the visitors were already starting to gather on the people's lawn. i have covered a couple of these, david. they can be very, very chilly. here's the good news, the forecast calls for maybe 40 degrees when the president takes the oath on monday. >> we'll take 40. >> david kerley, see you at the capital. >> want to bring in ginger zee. >> it's going to be 40 degrees. not bad at all. we're lucky it's not happening on tuesday. that's when a huge push of arctic air is coming
) to be an eighth-grader. the collaborative has chosen for the second place at 12 greater, from abraham lincoln high school. stephanie chung (applause) and then we have a number of first place winners. i'm sure this is all about collaboration, talking about it, what it means absorbing the purpose and working together. the first place poster altogether for all of us to see. i would like to name everybody. community youth center of san francisco, the young asian women against violence youth participant jennifer chang. kimberly how. erica lam. allie lee. adriana wen (sounds like) diana -- and amy ung. congratulations everybody. (applause) (applause) (applause) good job everybody. thank you. and so at this time supervisor -- or do i give it back to -- nancy. thank you again. >> at this time we would like to call supervisor carmen chu. (applause) >> i think that is part of the program they wanted the winners to perhaps say a few words. >> thank you for choosing our picture. we were really surprised when you did. we are really happy. (applause) >> we were very surprised. thank you very much.
know what he did. famous brothers. anybody like that. >> also it's an award season. lincoln just one. the first book out about an intriguing character in the movie lincoln. mrs. lincoln's dress maker. >> if you see the movie you know she is an african american and she played a big part and this is a fiction book about her life. there are some things in there you might want to look at. >> this book is really something. you might not know vanessa redgrave won eerievery award th was to win. this is the first book about the redgraves and their lives and that family. >> speaking of family, though, dogs. this book, what's a dog for? >> their dog has become part of the family. how do you go from dogs to having to have insurance and having to worry about all kinds of things for dogs. >> vacation for your dog. >> therapy, everything. >> so what's a dog for? >> i know some people love cats. who was the best cat lover. you never know julia child really loved cats. that's a part of her life. >> this book is about julius cats. winter is coming here and if you go -- who better fob your guide? john
's going to invoke lincoln with the loin continue bible and martin luther king, both of whom are figures of great national unity. and common national purpose. he should pick up that kind of tone, take from lincoln's second inaugural that sense that we're all fallen and all searching in a sense looking through a glass darkly to the future and trying as a common national purpose from different points of view to find the way for the nation. he should take that big-hearted, big sense of this great purpose of the nation and invoke it to the moment. >> and, clark, going into his second term, this being his second inaugural, how does that impact the approach to this speech versus, you know, when he was going into his first inauguration? >> well, most presidents when they reach their second inaugural, have a certain amount of viewing with satisfaction, what they've achieved, what the nation has achieved, not they but invoking the nation as the achiever, and then looking to the future with a purpose, as i said. good models for this besides lincoln would be both reagan and clinton, each of whom fa
the inauguration. on monday he will place his hands on two bibles. one from abraham lincoln and the other from dr. martin luther king jr. andrew seattle who is with the freedom from religion foundation. mr. stittle, abraham lincoln and dr. king too two amazing american icons you want to take their bibles and remove them from the ceremony. >> i much prefer dr. king's writing on the letter from the birmingham jail where he talks about the white church standing on the sideline mouthing trivialalities and pyes irrelevancy while he does the work of the civil rights movement. >> bill: you must know that dr. king invoked god in almost every speech that he made. >> article 2 section one of the constitution which lays out the oath does not say anything about the word so help me god. it says i will preserve to the best of my ability, preserve, defend and protect the states period. it's kind of ironic that the president is going to amend that in the middle of it. >> bill: do you know why george washington wanted the words god so help me god in? do you know why? >> george washington did not say so help me go
with his eloquence. and then, beyond the reflecting pool, the dignified columns of the lincoln memorial. whoever would understand in his heart the meaning of america will find it in the life of abraham lincoln. beyond those monuments to heroism is the potomac river, and on the far shore the sloping hills of arlington national cemetery, with its row upon row of simple white markers bearing crosses or stars of david. they add up to only a tiny fraction of the price that has been paid for our freedom. each one of those markers is a monument to the kind of hero i spoke of earlier. their lives ended in places called belleau wood, the argonne, omaha beach, salerno, and halfway around the world on guadalcanal, tarawa, pork chop hill, the chosin reservoir, and in a hundred rice paddies and jungles of a place called vietnam. under one such marker lies a young man, martin treptow, who left his job in a small town barbershop in 1917 to go to france with the famed rainbow division. there, on the western front, he was killed trying to carry a message between battalions under heavy artillery fire. we
of this inauguration is the completion of the capitol dome. in two years earlier, when lincoln became president, the dome was have finished, and it was an eyesore. the conventional wisdom, awe cannot finish this. to lincoln, the half finished dome symbolized a hal divided nation. it is a symbol that we can do a lot in this country. >> after the ceremony, the luncheon -- you mentioned new york food. how have you inserted new york into this experience? what will you be doing with the president and first lady? >> will serve a white wine from the finger lakes and a red wine from long island. both are worth winning. -- award-winning. losi, andpaul peo others did the tasting. we have cheese, new york. apple cobbler is made from apples from columbia county. the chef was trained in dutchess county. there is maple syrup that is part of the sauces that is from dutchess county as well. they serve some honey as well. from a.ing to serve it -- an apiary. a young woman started to have a business that was booming. it was wiped out by hurricane sandy. we got the honey from rochester. >> how did you get into th
. when lincoln creates lincoln is a talking about secession. he said you are sugarcoating the picture of this country. the printers that we cannot put this in the official record. and he said i can't imagine no american not knowing what sugarcoating men's. this goes back to william safire's influence. one of the first uses of cool, not in a sense the sense of temperature but in the sense of being callous, he said that was a behavioral thing. those are words, words like cool. obama could come up with a new meaning for it as well. he could take his own word and given a new meaning. how either this was i did a lot of reading and i did a lot of use of huge proprietary databases that the libraries tab. nineteenth century databases where we can actually find the original document in which jefferson writes to the danbury caucus and comes up with a phrase of separation of church and state, which is not in the constitution. in fact it was first articulated in this letter by jefferson. so there were these big huge data proprietary bases where there is about every word and phrase. mckinley came
was issued by president abraham lincoln, january 1, 1863. one of the most influential documents that declared all persons held as slaves within the confederate territory are here for and henceforth held free. i just want to go on record publicly acknowledging 150 years. that is quite an accomplishment. today's actually the 84th anniversary of doctor martin luther king's birth. many people know who doctor king was, a clergyman, activist, husband, father, the most prominent promoter of nonviolence and civil disobedience; he received the nobel peace prize in 1964 in recognition of his nonviolence. only we discussing assault weapons ban ammunitions but acknowledging that today would have been doctor martin luther king's 84th birthday, a very prolific activist. i would like to recognize and former city employee and decorated soldier mr. hillyer terry, born june 4, 1923. while attending college he was drafted to serve in world war ii; he served the united states army from 1943 to 1946 where he received an honorable discharge; he was awarded the american theater campaign medal; the eaim ca
, and it is still there just west of lincoln, just west from ninth avenue. it was built to help service people who were working on the big winter fair. they are still hoping the neighborhood. >> it is an offshoot of the 1892-8093 columbian exposition in chicago. when they were done, san francisco said bring it here. >> that is the chicken ranch. the building to the east of that is the chicken ranch, and you can see beyond to the west all sand dunes and hollows and gullies. that is one of the row houses we were talking about. as late as 1910, there were crackdowns and vice raids [laughter] >> that is a good way to say it. >> that is the racetrack grandstand. >> that is huge. >> opening day in 1895 through 14,000 people. they put a train line to it. they had a street car line. it was a big deal in those days, horse racing was. >> reason really interesting progress about car bill. tell us about what cargo was. >> in 1895, adolph sutro owned a couple blocks of land, which were sand dunes. the pavement, the streets. south of golden gate park. there was a train line that brought people from downtown to
. the car designer bought the "lincoln futura" with its bubble top for áooe-dollará in customized the car for the on the popular show for two ed - years in the mid-19-60's. now the batmobile is expected to rake in seven plesaent this weekend ...but some very cood weather is on the way here's emily gracey with hee ssywattc . forecast. &p you can ,3 you can be in harge of your own &p i-radar is now available at foxbaltimmre dot com. use the inttractive tools to prack coming storms down to your street. go to foxbaalimore dot com and click onni-rrdar dean pees is willing to go tt extreme measures to stop tom brady...the former olyypic athlete he wants to sign to next in sports unlimited... 3 3 3 th [ male announcer ] now at your neighbighborhood sub: the big hot pastrami melt. we perfected the pastrami sandwich -- filled with hot, juicy pastrami, pickles, yellow mustard and bubbly melted cheese. all piled-high on our signature freshly baked bread. made hot, toasty and just for you. and don't be afraid to put your spin on this deli style deliciousity -
to be photographed. during lincoln's second inaugural was the first to have african americans to take part. president george w. bush became the nation's 43rd president on january 20, 2001 after defeating al gore that ended in a supreme court decision in december of that year. the enaugust ration was attended by 3,000 people. this is about a 15 minutes. [applause] >> are you ready to take the oath? i, george walker bush do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. and will to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help me god. congratulations. [applause] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states, george w. bush. [applause] >> president clinton, distinguished guests and my fellow citizens, the peaceful transfer of authority is rare in history, yet common in our country. with a simple oath, we affirm old traditions and make new beginnings. as i begin, i thank president clinton for his service to our nation. [applause] and i thank vice president gore for a contest co
republicans elected a white house screening of "lincoln" last month. had mitch mcconnell, john boehner, lamar alexander attended, they were all invited, they would have joined not only nancy pelosi, harry reid but steven spielberg, tommy lee jones. as tip o'neill famously said about his political foe, ronald reagan, love the sinner. hate the sin. when president reagan would invite the speaker, tip o'neill over to the white house for drinks and raise a glass to one another. there's no shortage of parties planned around inauguration 2013. here is hoping it spills over to the next four years and both sides of the aisle make a move to be more social and more civil. and, hence, more productive. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "the ed show" with ed schultz, starts right now. >>> good evening, americans. welcome "the ed show" from new york. republicans are raising the white flag. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> they will not collect a ransom in exchange for not crashing the american economy. >> the republican game of chicken is over. eric cantore proposes a three-mo
, with the lincoln bible, and the mlk bible, 150 years ago. the emancipation proclamation, he could not be standing up there, barack obama a black man. and dr. king, without him, he would not be standing there. so the two men, he is there with both bibles. it's just a sense of conformation about what a country we are. >> despite the conformation and all the pomp and circumstances, the president needs to work with congress and the republican house that he has butted heads with so much, how do you think the president should address the bitter partisan divide that exists in washington in the speech? >> i was just reading franklin roosevelt's second inauguration speech and he was in the a similar situation to barack obama. the economy was struggling. and he did not give a speech that was designed to say, heal the nation's wounds and bring the nation together. he gave a surprisingly polarizing speech saying we have a ways to go. we have got a -- it's not about more for those who already have much. it's about helping those who have nothing. it was called the one-third of the nation speech, because he poi
complex. >> he continued for a cause he knew was right. that's the lesson of lincoln, of dr. king and president obama. dr. reverend walker who chaired dr. king used to always remind me of his favorite kwoet from dr. king. he would say you measure not a man by the way he is stands in time of convenience, but where he stands in the times of controversy. the president, now dr. king and even lincoln before. they stood in the most controversial and perilous times. people that show leadership and stability and vision and commitment when it's the most difficult of times. any one can shine when everything is going well. but it's when it is the darkest that we can see those that really bear the brightest lights. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >> hey, lance, tell us something we don't know. let's play "hardball. "hardbal. >> good evening. let's start with this. lance slide. it's not like we didn't see this coming for a long time. extra power or linebacker hoping for some extra muscle. no, lance armstrong was an international hero. a seven time-tour de fra
meeting george washington in his underpants or abraham lincoln. at least for my students at rutgers university, martin luther king, that is really the past back there with washington and lincoln or something, all of american history before they were born is ancient history to them. there he is in white boxer shorts and i go in and we americans are in formal. he was taking a nap which i understood perfectly. i began to talk to him about we have got to do something about the media because if i found you they will find you and drive you crazy and you want to take it easy today. i want to help you take it easy today. and here is what i recommend. i recommend that i let the press attache set up a press conference of only half an hour in the ballroom of the hotel limited to half an hour. i will do the interpreting and he will set it up for an hour from now. i understand you are just here to see the town but if we don't do that, the paparrazzi will drive us crazy so if we don't do this and say it is limited to that, and he said okay so i called the embassy and he set it up. later on it was
and pennsylvania avenue before the parade starts? does everyone have to go around the capitol and lincoln memorial? >> this is a supersatisfying answer, we can get back to you. we have a team that concentrates on logistics. that was an issue four years ago with getting across pennsylvania. i can follow up afterwards and put you in touch with the right folks. >> what's your best guess for the running time of the ceremony from start to finish and parade from start to finish? >> i can handle the ceremony portion of it. we expect that the announcements on the platform, former presidents will begin around 11:00 and 30 minutes to announce everyone that will be seated on the platform. senator schumer opens the ceremony at 11:30 and expect the president to take the oath at noon and will be a couple -- beyonce immediately after that to wrap things up and the final musical act. and hope to have everyone back inside at 12:30. music begins at 9:30 in the morning and v.i.p.'s, past presidents will begin heading out to the platform at 9:45 in the morning. after the inaugural speech and the performances at the e
lincoln and dr. martin luther king junior. president obama's inauguration is monday. >> washington gearing up for the 57th inauguration. crews busy getting everything in place. and it's lower than the $8 million. the number is higher than previous inauguration autos abc 7 coverage of the inauguration begins monday at 4:00 a.m. with a special edition of abc "good morning america". we'll stream coverage live from washington on abc 7 news.com starting at 6:30 monday morning so onair, and online. >> so how are apple, google and microsoft doing? plus more trouble at fox con. >> yes. we're live from bloomberg west with that and more on your bloomberg after the bell report. hi, emily. >> good afternoon, google's ceo larry page, tim cook and microsoft ceo will be facing wall street next week. the companies report earnings for the holiday quarter. it's the first time in three years they're expecting earnings to fall year over year. and it's apple wednesday, shares under pressure since september and fell in the last week after reports of week iphone 5 demand. microsoft on thursday, it comes down to
lincoln y el referencia rend martin luther king a quiÉn les lindorÁ hombre gel al usar sus bi materias para jument ar el lunes. >>> y josÉ no solo mucha pompa y circunstancia, sino tambiÉn mucha seguridad, seis mil efectivo de las guardia nacional de 31 estados estarÁn aquÍ en la capital del paÍs vigilando la juramentaciÓn del presidente. >>> josÉ?. >>> angie sandoval gracias mary. >>> bueno les queremos recordar yo que tenemos cobertura completa de la juramentaciÓn presidencial comenzando este lunes a las diez de la maÑana hora del este, y nueve centro, 7 de la maÑana hora del pacÍfico asÍ que nos pueden acompaÑar tambiÉn este domingo tendremos pues detalles de lo que pase previo a este gran evento. >>> y con esto llego el al final, gracias por dejaron ser parte de su semana y nos vemos el domingo en enfoque, hasta entonces. >>>
of the lincoln battle group, they saw american military men and women in uniform as well as partnering with non-governmental organizations like project hope, operation smile, doctors without borders, they saw all those people coming off the ships and taking care of their loved ones, taking care of those who were hopeless and helpless. they saw that and it turned them around. it made the world a better place. it certainly made indonesia a better place, but it made the world a better place. it made it a little less dangerous than it is today simply because we took a country that was predominately anti-american sentiment and through that past tragedy and catastrophe and our response to it, we flipped the sentiment and it was ultimately pro-american in sentiment and we decided to create sustainment missions to sustain that goodwill and that's where the mercy taking off as it does out of san diego and goes around the asian pacific rim. that is why the comfort takes off and heads down to south america, to show goodwill, not to be the american country that comes down there and shows people how it'
or nics. it's a command and control web-based tool that we're looking with mit lincoln labs and dss and i would foresee when we stand up our wing operation center at miramar that the marine corps liaison and the navy liaison and if need be the guard liaison would have access to that tool. the next generation command system is a fantastic web-based command and control technology that we expect to use in the future. with that, thank you. >> thanks. colonel yeager. >> i just want to say you can't underestimate the risk presented by these environments we fly in and really the relationships that we build with cal fire and the training prepares us to mitigate that risk. as rear admiral riveras said, bad things tend it happen at night. they also happen on the weekend and i think we have a 3-day week jepld here but i assure you we are ready to respond. >> from personal experience in 2007, i started training for fire fighting in 2006 but in 2007 was my first actual experience fighting fires and as i went in for my first dip in san diego to fill the bucket about two miles away was my brothers
dr. katie and president lincoln. they're actors, the movement there represented are the only reason it's possible for me to be inaugurated. at chicago union station congressman danny davis boarded an amtrak train for a 17 hour ride to the nation's capital with high hopes for what lies ahead. the president was reelected which is an indication to us that this continues to move in a positive and progressive way. the south shore drill team is gearing up right now they are going to hit the road later on tonight they needed $45,000 to make this trip happen so far they have raised more than 50,000. the 500 lb. cheesecake made right here in chicago always in front of the camera for the big events around the country. this is their fourth inauguration trip celebration cakes for the president's first one the white house releasing president obama as second presidential portraits days before the inauguration this time he opted for a smile the new photo was shot in the oval office on december 6th. join us monday for his second inauguration. our special coverage at 9:00 a.m. the theme of this year
on memorial today. fox ever -- lincoln memorial today. fox 5's photojournalist steve jones was there today. >> but 100 years later the negro still is not free. >> it does make the speech fun because you get to learn about all the people who made your life better. >> soldiers have come fresh from their jail cells. >> and some of you have come from areas where a quest, quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. >> lots of them came from areas where they wanted to be free, but the people got in their way. >> let freedom ring from the snow capped rockies of colorado. >> let freedom ring from the courageous vaults of california. >> but not only that. let freedom ring from the stone mountains of georgia. >> is in so important for the kids to -- this is so important for the kids to really know their history and why they go to the schools that they go to. >> it was really inspiring to do it because i know that a great man once said these words. >> and when this happens when we allow freedom to ring. when we allow it to ring from
have climate change review by the university of nebraska at lincoln. finally, one of my favorite people who has worked along side for many years, veronica johnson. veronica is a news person for nbc. there was a time when the news people are more likely not to have the background. she is of a new generation of meteorologists who not only have great credentials but a study of science on an ongoing basis. she is a phenomenal scientist. onhak you. >> this session we really want to get you thinking. let me talk about journalists that we have today. >> okay, that's a pretty good number. we want to get everyone thinking about droughts in this discussion. you think that we can have a mega-drought? we saw how bad 2012 was in areas of the midwest and parts of the country. what about policy? do you think that we are doing enough? and what about the impact of drought on social marginalization? as we go forth, we are going to be taking some kick off questions and you will notice that there are some index cards underneath your chair. if you can periodically throughout the session, right on some of th
will, indeed. >> a lot of good movies. have you seen lincoln. >> i have not but i'm told i should. >> he's great. >> he's number two. >> daniel day-lewis. >> tommy lee jones is brilliant. >> and hell of a nice guy here. >> are you still winning, charlie? >> today i am with you. absolutely. >> it's been brilliant to see you again. >> likewise. thank you so much. >> come back again. >> you're an absolute pro. >> thank you. >> i appreciate it. >> that's all for us tonight. anderson cooper starts now. >>> we all know there's a good network he sort of broke down telling oprah what it was like as a father of five kids to lie to a child, to lie to a son, his son luke. >> when this all really started, i saw my son defending me and saying, that's not true. what you're saying about my dad is not true. and it almost goes to this question of why now. you know, he can't -- yeah. that's when i knew i had to tell him. >> what did you say? >> i said, listen, there's been a lot of questions about your dad. my career, whether i doped or did not dope. i have always denied that, and i have always bee
- lincoln did it. they put a package and gave you what you want me what i want met in the middle. he's taking out everything for himself. already. fair and balanced after the break. you will hear from one mayor that is supporting the push for tighter gun control. the mayor of south carolina who is part of the poll and mayors against illegal guns . what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when joint pain and stiffness from psoriatic arthritis hit, even the smallest things became difficult. i finally understood what serious joint pain is like. i talked to my rheumatologist and he prescribed enbrel. enbrel can help relieve pain, stiffness, and stop joint damage. enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes
his famous i have a dream speech on the opposite end of the map on the steps of the lincoln memorial. that dream, of course, talked about the day when america, they would reach a sense of equality and of course the election of president obama, the nation's first african american president that has to be seen as the ultimate political expression of that equality. reporting live in washington, i'm randall pinkston -- pinkston, back to you. >> how will it differ from four years ago? >> reporter: well first of all it will be a ceremonial inauguration, not the official inauguration as we have mentioned earlier on the actual date of the inauguration. it has to be on january 20. that's a sunday. the public wants to witness it themselves. it will be a second ceremonial inauguration on monday that people, they will be able to attend. >> all right, live for us in washington, enjoy the festivities, randall. >>> around here a lot warmer than what he is experiencing there in d.c. and sunny skies this weekend. >> yeah, i was there for the inauguration
recently no elected republicans elected a white house screening of "lincoln" last month. had mitch mcconnell, john boehner, lamar alexander attended, they were all invited, they would have joined not only nancy pelosi, harry reid but steven spielberg, tommy lee jones. as tip o'neill famously said about his political foe, ronald reagan, love the sinner. hate the sin. when president reagan would invite the speaker, tip o'neill over to the white house for drinks and raise a glass to one another. there's no shortage of parties planned around inauguration
republican party of abraham lincoln. >> those extremists were alive and well this week, calling for the president's impeachment and saying president obama was acting like a king with his executive orders on gun safety. this kind of extremism gets them a 26% rating. do you think that really is what it's all about? or is it the obstruction or both? >> i think the rating is going to go down, ed. i think we're looking at potential for the republican party to be rated in the eyes of the american people much the way the entire congress is rated. do nothing and down in the teens. and as i said, that's suicide for the republican party. >> at the same retreat today, republicans were told by a pollster to stop talking about rape. pretty good advice, i would say. is this because the extremism takes over the discussion when republicans do try to talk about issues as sensitive as that? >> in many respects some of them do not know how to talk about it, ed. you heard what colin powell said, what you played there. i've heard what colin powell has said for the past 20 years or so about racism in
is wrong. >> will you watch the oscars? >> i will, indeed. >> a lot of good movies. have you seen lincoln. >> i have not but i'm told i should. >> he's great. >> he's number two. >> daniel day-lewis. >> tommy lee jones is brilliant.
there to help you. and i would also obviously abraham lincoln and par tin luther king are going to be mentioned, at least their spirit for sure. i would wiped it to women. nobody seems to ever name drop susan b. anthony or eleanor roosevelt. it might be time for that now, particularly since the president's been getting some heat of not having enough women in his second term and the women's vote contributed to his re-election mightily. >> historically speaking, how much does a second inaugural speech matter? does it set the tone? do people hold the presidential account foblable for it? >> not too many matter. abraham lincoln's is the huge exception, that with malice toward none speech but he was uttering it when it looked like the union was going to be victorious. they're important as olive branch speeches. jefferson said in 1801, we are not federalists or not republicans. we're americans essentially. and the president might want to take that kind of bipartisan tone. it's about a unity speech. and anybody who's looking for a lot of new policy ideas are not going to get any. this is about poetry
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